Meet the artists at the heart of Word for Word’s production of All Aunt Hagar’s Children. Your generosity helps them breathe life into Jones’ story as they bring it from the page to the stage.

 

Edward P. Jones, Author

The New York Times bestselling author has been awarded the Pulitzer Prize for fiction, the National Book Critics Circle award, the International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award, and the Lannan Literary Award for The Known World; he also received a MacArthur Fellowship in 2004. His first collection of stories, Lost in the City, won the PEN/Hemingway Award and was short listed for the National Book Award. His second collection, All Aunt Hagar’s Children, was a finalist for the Pen/Faulkner Award. He has been an instructor of fiction writing at a range of universities, including Princeton. He lives in Washington, D.C.


Stephanie Hunt, Director and Charter Member of Word for Word

Stephanie is a director, actor, and teacher. For Word for Word, she directed the long-running, award-winning production of Tobias Wolff’s Bullet in the Brain and Lady’s Dream as well as Cornell Woolrich’s noir thriller Angel Face. At the University of San Francisco, she directed her adaptation of Alice Munro’s short story The View from Castle Rock. As an actor, she has originated roles in stories by Upton Sinclair, Angela Carter, Tobias Wolff, Andrew Sean Greer, Susan Glaspell, Virginia Woolf, and Colm Tóibín. In the Bay Area, Stephanie has acted at the Magic Theatre, Berkeley Repertory Theatre, Encore Theatre, Aurora Theatre, Campo Santo, and was a founding member of the improv group Pulp Playhouse, which played at the Eureka Theatre. Stephanie holds an M.F.A. from American Conservatory Theater and a B.A. from San Francisco State University, but originally she studied and performed at the Back Alley Theater on F Street and 7th NW in Washington, DC.


Margo Hall, Assistant Director

Aunt Penny, Minnie Parsons

Margo is an award winning actor/director/playwright and is excited to be back as a performer with Word for Word where she has directed, acted, and taught. Most recently, she was seen onstage in Fences at California Shakespeare Theater, and directed Red Velvet for SF Playhouse. Other credits include Gem of the Ocean, Fences and Seven Guitars for Marin Theatre Company, Ah, Wilderness! and Marcus or the Secret of Sweet at American Conservatory Theater, The Motherf*#ker With the Hat for SF Playhouse, Twelfth Night, A Winter’s Tale, A Midsummer Night’s Dream and Spunk for California Shakespeare Theater and Trouble in Mind at the Aurora Theatre . She is a founding member of Campo Santo, and has directed, performed and collaborated on several new plays with Naomi Iizuka, Jessica Hagedorn, Phillip Kan Gotanda, and Octavio Solis.


SHIELA BALTER Miriam Sobel “Each time I begin reading Edward P. Jones, I cannot help but be drawn in by the compassion, poetry and intelligence of his writing.  This story is no exception.  He should be a household name everywhere.”

SHIELA BALTER

Miriam Sobel

“Each time I begin reading Edward P. Jones, I cannot help but be drawn in by the compassion, poetry and intelligence of his writing.  This story is no exception.  He should be a household name everywhere.”

EDRIS COOPER-ANIFOWOSHE Miss Agatha, childhood self, Harriet, church lady "As a potent slice of African American life, Aunt Hagar's Children beautifully captures the complexity of an era and the particulars of a place - its grace, nuances, challenges and triumphs - with amazing specificity and breathtaking urgency.  This characteristics of this life is part of my legacy as an African American and I am excited and grateful for the opportunity to live in these character's shoes."

EDRIS COOPER-ANIFOWOSHE

Miss Agatha, childhood self, Harriet, church lady

"As a potent slice of African American life, Aunt Hagar's Children beautifully captures the complexity of an era and the particulars of a place - its grace, nuances, challenges and triumphs - with amazing specificity and breathtaking urgency.  This characteristics of this life is part of my legacy as an African American and I am excited and grateful for the opportunity to live in these character's shoes."

VELINA BROWN His Mother “I find Edward P. Jones' writing in general and this story in particular to be a fascinating antidote to the evening news.”

VELINA BROWN

His Mother

“I find Edward P. Jones' writing in general and this story in particular to be a fascinating antidote to the evening news.”

KEHINDE KOYEJO Alona, Blondelle Steadman "Jones creates characters that are so beautifully layered that you can't help but see the complexities of the human race and value of humanity."

KEHINDE KOYEJO

Alona, Blondelle Steadman

"Jones creates characters that are so beautifully layered that you can't help but see the complexities of the human race and value of humanity."

KHARY L. MOYE The Young Man “I think the importance of telling this story lies in our paths of finding ourselves. Going on this journey with The Young Man, a soldier coming home from defending his country and probably not knowing what's next in life, he matures in front of our very eyes. It's a transformation we all go through in different ways but never get to actually witness. This beautiful story allows us to do just that.”

KHARY L. MOYE

The Young Man

“I think the importance of telling this story lies in our paths of finding ourselves. Going on this journey with The Young Man, a soldier coming home from defending his country and probably not knowing what's next in life, he matures in front of our very eyes. It's a transformation we all go through in different ways but never get to actually witness. This beautiful story allows us to do just that.”

JOEL MULLENNIX Sam Jaffe, Alabama Man “It is an illuminating expression of the simultaneous impulses for independence and community.  I love the use of a noir style mystery as a means of discovery. The story is set in a very specific and interesting time and place and viscerally and poetically depicts the connection between people who have suffered.”

JOEL MULLENNIX

Sam Jaffe, Alabama Man

“It is an illuminating expression of the simultaneous impulses for independence and community.  I love the use of a noir style mystery as a means of discovery. The story is set in a very specific and interesting time and place and viscerally and poetically depicts the connection between people who have suffered.”

JIA TAYLOR Mary Saunders, Sheila Larkin “Jones brings to life a city that is hardly ever written about. It is not the Washington of national politics but a place where African-Americans try to make a better life for themselves during the 20th Century. It’s a story that depicts real people in real neighborhoods dealing with some of the same issues we deal with today -  displacement, frustration, broken families, relationships, loneliness, all while searching for hope and change.”

JIA TAYLOR

Mary Saunders, Sheila Larkin

“Jones brings to life a city that is hardly ever written about. It is not the Washington of national politics but a place where African-Americans try to make a better life for themselves during the 20th Century. It’s a story that depicts real people in real neighborhoods dealing with some of the same issues we deal with today -  displacement, frustration, broken families, relationships, loneliness, all while searching for hope and change.”

JOANNE WINTER & SUSAN HARLOE Word for Word Artistic Directors

JOANNE WINTER & SUSAN HARLOE

Word for Word Artistic Directors